CBG for Nausea: Can It Help? [What Research Says]

The hemp plant has been researched for its beneficial effects on nausea, but so far, most of that research has focused on CBD (cannabidiol) and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), two well-known cannabinoids in hemp that also have a variety of benefits. 

But there’s another cannabinoid with similarly immense benefits: CBG (cannabigerol). Among other things, there is a bit of research to show CBG may help with nausea. In this article, we’ll discuss that research. We’ll also discuss how CBG works in your body, how it compares to CBD for nausea, and how best to use it.

24webp
It's time for CBG products that actually work.

You deserve better. That's why you won’t find weak, ineffective, or dangerous products here. Only high-strength, American-made CBG products that have been 3rd-party lab tested.

What is CBG?

Cannabigerol (CBG) is a cannabinoid that naturally occurs in the hemp plant. Hemp is a variety of cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC. 

CBG is considered a minor cannabinoid, as it only occurs in hemp in small amounts. However, it’s actually the cannabinoid from which all others are derived. Research suggests CBG may have therapeutic potential for inflammation, pain, anxiety, nausea, and more. 

Can CBG Help With Nausea?

CBG hasn’t been researched as heavily as many cannabinoids, and as such, little investigation has been done into its benefits for nausea. Nevertheless, there is one study that suggests it may have antiemetic (anti-vomiting and anti-nausea) properties. 

A study done on rats found that CBG, by itself, suppressed acute nausea. However, the research also found that CBG may nullify the beneficial effects of CBD on nausea, which means these cannabinoids are most beneficial for nausea if used separately. 

This is notable because, for most therapeutic uses, combining CBG and CBD renders more benefits them using them by themselves

Firsthand experiences of people who have tried CBG for nausea are also by-and-large positive, with many reporting that it’s helped them. 

Although CBG isn’t the only cannabinoid that has potential antiemetic benefits, many people prefer it for daytime use because of its uplifting, energizing effect profile. CBD is calming and relaxing, while THC is relaxing and will create a head high.  

Natural Ways CBD and CBG gummies

How CBG Works

CBG works by interacting with your body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS), a receptor system that regulates all of your vital functions, including inflammatory and pain responses, body temperature, and eating. The ECS works to keep your body in a state of homeostasis, or balance – healthy ECS function is associated with normal states of health. 

Introducing outside cannabinoids, such as CBG, may help to promote the functions of your ECS, therefore helping it balance your body. 

There are two main types of receptors in your ECS:

  • CB1 receptors, which create mental sensations when stimulated
  • CB2 receptors, which create physical sensations when stimulated 

CBG can bind to both receptor types, thereby creating both mental and physical benefits, including potential antiemetic effects. 

CBG vs. CBD for Nausea

CBD (cannabidiol) is another cannabinoid in hemp that is just as beneficial as CBG. It’s become very popular in the world of cannabinoids for its wide range of therapeutic benefits. 

Like CBG, CBD may have antiemetic effects. One review of studies found that CBD may be “effective clinically for treating both nausea and vomiting produced by chemotherapy or other therapeutic treatments.”

Researchers haven’t compared how well CBG and CBD work for nausea. What we do know is that you should choose one or the other, instead of using them together, because CBG may reduce CBD’s antiemetic benefits. 

Because we don’t have comparative research, when it comes to deciding which cannabnioid to choose for nausea, we recommend considering what effects you want to feel.

 CBG is energetic and uplifting, and it tends to promote feelings of mental clarity. CBG won’t get you high, though – it’s effects are more comparable to drinking coffee. 

CBD, on the other hand, is calming and relaxing, and like CBG, it won’t create a high.

Based on this, you might find that CBG is preferable for daytime nausea, while CBD is better at night – but ultimately, it’s up to you.   

How to Take CBG for Nausea

There are several ways you can take CBG. When considering your options, we recommend you pay attention to the onset time of each – the amount of time you’ll need to wait before feeling the effects. Here’s a bit about the different types of CBG products and the corresponding onset times:

CBG Oil

CBG oil consists of hemp extract (the CBG) and carrier oil. Instead of swallowing oils as you would edible products, you take them under the tongue. 

The CBG-infused oil is absorbed into the blood vessels in your mouth and delivered directly to the bloodstream, which allows for a quick onset; CBG oil begins working in just 10-15 minutes. One of the main upsides of CBG oil is that it can be dosed very precisely. 

CBG Edibles

CBG edibles, such as gummies, offer a fixed-dose consumption method, so they’re great if you need to take the same amount of CBG consistently. 

Since gummies taste like candy, they may be preferable if you’re dealing with nausea and feeling sick. However, edibles have to be digested, so they take 45 minutes 1 to hour to begin working. 

CBG Capsules

CBG capsules offer an alternative to edibles if you prefer to take things in capsule form. There are a several types of capsules available: there are classic capsules, and then there are softgels, which enclose CBG oil in a digestible gel-like outer casing. Like edibles, capsules begin working in 45 minutes to 1 hour. 

CBG Inhalables (Flower & Vapes)

CBG-dominant strains of hemp flower, as well as CBG vapes, are two other product options that are available. 

Inhaling CBG comes with the obvious health downside, but flowers and vapes begin working in just 5-10 minutes, as they deliver CBG directly to your lungs. 

It may be worth it for the fast onset, however, if you’re dealing with nausea and also struggling with a sore throat, you might not want to smoke or vape anything. 

CBG Dosage for Nausea

Although researchers haven’t determined the best dose of CBG for nausea, anecdotal evidence suggests lower doses are more effective. 

Starting out, you can calculate your dose using this formula:

(0.1) x (your body weight in lbs.) = your daily CBG dose for nausea in mg. 

Once you’ve used this dose a few times, adjust it depending on how it’s working for you. The dosage amount this formula gives is enough for 1 day; you can either take it all at once as a preventive, or you can use smaller amounts throughout the day as needed. 

Natural Ways CBD and CBG gummies

Conclusion: Is CBG A Viable Natural Supplement for Nausea?

While CBG hasn’t been researched very much for use with nausea, studies so far suggest it may have therapeutic potential in this area. However, what scientists haven’t investigated is how effective CBG is for nausea in relation to other cannabinoids, or to over-the-counter drugs. 

CBG is worth a try for nausea, but if you’re searching for long-term nausea treatment due to ongoing discomfort caused by treatment for cancer or other ailments, we recommend discussing your options with a doctor beforehand to ensure the option you’re choosing is sustainable. 

Ready to explore products? Check out our guide to the best CBG gummies.

CBG for Nausea: Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some questions our customers frequently ask us about using CBG for nausea. 

Does CBG help with nausea?

Research and anecdotal evidence suggests CBG may have antiemetic (anti-nausea and anti-vomiting) effects. 

What does CBG do for your stomach?

Research suggests CBG may have anti-nausea and anti-vomiting benefits, however, more studies are needed to investigate how CBG works for stomach disorders. 

Which cannabinoid for nausea?

Studies show that THC, CBD, and CBG all may have benefits for nausea, however, there isn’t research comparing their efficacy for this use.

The hemp plant has been researched for its beneficial effects on nausea, but so far, most of that research has focused on CBD (cannabidiol) and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), two well-known cannabinoids in hemp that also have a variety of benefits. 

But there’s another cannabinoid with similarly immense benefits: CBG (cannabigerol). Among other things, there is a bit of research to show CBG may help with nausea. In this article, we’ll discuss that research. We’ll also discuss how CBG works in your body, how it compares to CBD for nausea, and how best to use it.

24webp
It's time for CBG products that actually work.

You deserve better. That's why you won’t find weak, ineffective, or dangerous products here. Only high-strength, American-made CBG products that have been 3rd-party lab tested.

What is CBG?

Cannabigerol (CBG) is a cannabinoid that naturally occurs in the hemp plant. Hemp is a variety of cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC. 

CBG is considered a minor cannabinoid, as it only occurs in hemp in small amounts. However, it’s actually the cannabinoid from which all others are derived. Research suggests CBG may have therapeutic potential for inflammation, pain, anxiety, nausea, and more. 

Can CBG Help With Nausea?

CBG hasn’t been researched as heavily as many cannabinoids, and as such, little investigation has been done into its benefits for nausea. Nevertheless, there is one study that suggests it may have antiemetic (anti-vomiting and anti-nausea) properties. 

A study done on rats found that CBG, by itself, suppressed acute nausea. However, the research also found that CBG may nullify the beneficial effects of CBD on nausea, which means these cannabinoids are most beneficial for nausea if used separately. 

This is notable because, for most therapeutic uses, combining CBG and CBD renders more benefits them using them by themselves

Firsthand experiences of people who have tried CBG for nausea are also by-and-large positive, with many reporting that it’s helped them. 

Although CBG isn’t the only cannabinoid that has potential antiemetic benefits, many people prefer it for daytime use because of its uplifting, energizing effect profile. CBD is calming and relaxing, while THC is relaxing and will create a head high.  

Natural Ways CBD and CBG gummies

How CBG Works

CBG works by interacting with your body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS), a receptor system that regulates all of your vital functions, including inflammatory and pain responses, body temperature, and eating. The ECS works to keep your body in a state of homeostasis, or balance – healthy ECS function is associated with normal states of health. 

Introducing outside cannabinoids, such as CBG, may help to promote the functions of your ECS, therefore helping it balance your body. 

There are two main types of receptors in your ECS:

  • CB1 receptors, which create mental sensations when stimulated
  • CB2 receptors, which create physical sensations when stimulated 

CBG can bind to both receptor types, thereby creating both mental and physical benefits, including potential antiemetic effects. 

CBG vs. CBD for Nausea

CBD (cannabidiol) is another cannabinoid in hemp that is just as beneficial as CBG. It’s become very popular in the world of cannabinoids for its wide range of therapeutic benefits. 

Like CBG, CBD may have antiemetic effects. One review of studies found that CBD may be “effective clinically for treating both nausea and vomiting produced by chemotherapy or other therapeutic treatments.”

Researchers haven’t compared how well CBG and CBD work for nausea. What we do know is that you should choose one or the other, instead of using them together, because CBG may reduce CBD’s antiemetic benefits. 

Because we don’t have comparative research, when it comes to deciding which cannabnioid to choose for nausea, we recommend considering what effects you want to feel.

 CBG is energetic and uplifting, and it tends to promote feelings of mental clarity. CBG won’t get you high, though – it’s effects are more comparable to drinking coffee. 

CBD, on the other hand, is calming and relaxing, and like CBG, it won’t create a high.

Based on this, you might find that CBG is preferable for daytime nausea, while CBD is better at night – but ultimately, it’s up to you.   

How to Take CBG for Nausea

There are several ways you can take CBG. When considering your options, we recommend you pay attention to the onset time of each – the amount of time you’ll need to wait before feeling the effects. Here’s a bit about the different types of CBG products and the corresponding onset times:

CBG Oil

CBG oil consists of hemp extract (the CBG) and carrier oil. Instead of swallowing oils as you would edible products, you take them under the tongue. 

The CBG-infused oil is absorbed into the blood vessels in your mouth and delivered directly to the bloodstream, which allows for a quick onset; CBG oil begins working in just 10-15 minutes. One of the main upsides of CBG oil is that it can be dosed very precisely. 

CBG Edibles

CBG edibles, such as gummies, offer a fixed-dose consumption method, so they’re great if you need to take the same amount of CBG consistently. 

Since gummies taste like candy, they may be preferable if you’re dealing with nausea and feeling sick. However, edibles have to be digested, so they take 45 minutes 1 to hour to begin working. 

CBG Capsules

CBG capsules offer an alternative to edibles if you prefer to take things in capsule form. There are a several types of capsules available: there are classic capsules, and then there are softgels, which enclose CBG oil in a digestible gel-like outer casing. Like edibles, capsules begin working in 45 minutes to 1 hour. 

CBG Inhalables (Flower & Vapes)

CBG-dominant strains of hemp flower, as well as CBG vapes, are two other product options that are available. 

Inhaling CBG comes with the obvious health downside, but flowers and vapes begin working in just 5-10 minutes, as they deliver CBG directly to your lungs. 

It may be worth it for the fast onset, however, if you’re dealing with nausea and also struggling with a sore throat, you might not want to smoke or vape anything. 

CBG Dosage for Nausea

Although researchers haven’t determined the best dose of CBG for nausea, anecdotal evidence suggests lower doses are more effective. 

Starting out, you can calculate your dose using this formula:

(0.1) x (your body weight in lbs.) = your daily CBG dose for nausea in mg. 

Once you’ve used this dose a few times, adjust it depending on how it’s working for you. The dosage amount this formula gives is enough for 1 day; you can either take it all at once as a preventive, or you can use smaller amounts throughout the day as needed. 

Natural Ways CBD and CBG gummies

Conclusion: Is CBG A Viable Natural Supplement for Nausea?

While CBG hasn’t been researched very much for use with nausea, studies so far suggest it may have therapeutic potential in this area. However, what scientists haven’t investigated is how effective CBG is for nausea in relation to other cannabinoids, or to over-the-counter drugs. 

CBG is worth a try for nausea, but if you’re searching for long-term nausea treatment due to ongoing discomfort caused by treatment for cancer or other ailments, we recommend discussing your options with a doctor beforehand to ensure the option you’re choosing is sustainable. 

Ready to explore products? Check out our guide to the best CBG gummies.

CBG for Nausea: Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some questions our customers frequently ask us about using CBG for nausea. 

Does CBG help with nausea?

Research and anecdotal evidence suggests CBG may have antiemetic (anti-nausea and anti-vomiting) effects. 

What does CBG do for your stomach?

Research suggests CBG may have anti-nausea and anti-vomiting benefits, however, more studies are needed to investigate how CBG works for stomach disorders. 

Which cannabinoid for nausea?

Studies show that THC, CBD, and CBG all may have benefits for nausea, however, there isn’t research comparing their efficacy for this use.

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